Capital Appreciation

Seeks to provide capital appreciation through an actively managed ETF

Concentrated Portfolio

Invests in 25-35 favorably valued companies with attractive dividends

Low Volatility

Seeks to deliver lower volatility than the overall market

DIVZ seeks to deliver lower volatility and higher dividends than the S&P 500 Index, while providing capital appreciation opportunities for investors.

Portfolio Characteristics

Data as of 09/30/2022

# of Stocks

P/S

P/E

P/B

Average Market Cap

Why Dividend Stocks May Be An Attractive Choice

Dividends have proven to be a significant contributor to historical U.S. equity returns. Dividend payouts can be viewed by investors as a sign of corporate health and may provide a buffer against equity volatility.

 In today’s low-rate environment, the current income provided by dividends could be attractive for income investors able to take on equity exposure. And unlike fixed income interest payments, dividends have the potential to grow over time.

Before investing, investors should consider the Fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses. The prospectus, or summary prospectus, containing this and other information may be obtained by visiting www.true-shares.com and should be read carefully prior to investing. 

RISK CONSIDERATIONS
The Fund may not achieve its objective and/or you could lose money on your investment in the Fund. The Fund is recently organized with no operating history for prospective investors to base their investment decision which may increase risks. Some of the Fund’s key risks, include but are not limited to the following risks. Please see the Fund’s prospectus for further information on these and other risk considerations.

ETF Risks. As an ETF, the Fund is exposed to the additional risks, including: (1) concentration risk associated with Authorized Participants, market makers, and liquidity providers; (2) costs risks associated with the frequent buying or selling of Fund shares; (3) market prices may differ than the Fund’s net asset value; and (4) liquidity risk due to a potential lack of trading volume. 

Dividend Paying Security Risk. Securities that pay high dividends as a group can fall out of favor with the market, causing these companies to underperform companies that do not pay high dividends. Dividends may also be reduced or discontinued. 

Equity Market Risk. Common stocks are susceptible to general stock market fluctuations and to volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change based on various and unpredictable factors including but not limited to: expectations regarding government, economic, monetary and fiscal policies; inflation and interest rates; economic expansion or contraction; and global or regional political, economic and banking crises. 

Market Capitalization Risk.  The Fund may invest is securities across all market cap ranges. The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion and may also be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies and generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large capitalization stocks. The securities of small-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large- or mid-capitalization companies and generally trade in lower volumes and are subject to greater and more unpredictable price changes than large- or mid-capitalization stocks.

Depositary Receipts Risk. American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) have risks similar to those of foreign securities (political and economic conditions, changes in the exchange rates, etc.) and entitle the holder to all dividends and capital gains that are paid out on the underlying foreign shares.

Index Descriptions: The S&P 500® Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index that measures the performance of the large-capitalization sector of the U.S.  stock market. Securities in the ETF’s portfolio will not match those in any index. The ETF is benchmark agnostic and corresponding portfolios may have significant non-correlation to any index. Index returns are generally provided as an overall market indicator. You cannot invest directly in an index. Although reinvestment of dividend and interest payments is assumed, no expenses are netted against an index’s returns. Index performance information was furnished by sources deemed reliable and is believed  to be accurate, however, no warranty or representation is made as to the accuracy thereof and the information is subject to correction.

P/S: Price to Shares Ratio: The price-to-sales (P/S) ratio is a valuation ratio that compares a company’s stock price to its revenues. It is an indicator of the value that financial markets have placed on each dollar of a company’s sales or revenues. The P/S ratio is calculated by dividing the stock price by the underlying company’s sales per share.
P/E: Price to Earnings Ratio: The price-to-earnings ratio (P/E ratio) is the ratio for valuing a company that measures its current share price relative to its per-share earnings (EPS). P/E = Earnings per share divided by Earnings per share.
P/B: Price to Book Ratio: Companies use the price-to-book ratio (P/B ratio) to compare a firm’s market capitalization to its book value. It’s calculated by dividing the company’s stock price per share by its book value per share (BVPS). An asset’s book value is equal to its carrying value on the balance sheet, and companies calculate it netting the asset against its accumulated depreciation.

Foreside Fund Services LLC, distributor.

NOT FDIC INSURED — NO BANK GUARANTEE — MAY LOSE VALUE